GTX 1070 as a CG Workstation GPU

GTX1070

The much awaited for 10xx series is out…and its undoubtedly good as a gaming GPU. But how good is it as a CG workstation GPU? Does it make a difference vs. a 9xx that was so far our “mid-range” GPU recommendation?

 

FooBench Configuration

Processor Intel i7-4770K Quad Core 3.5GHz
4 Cores, 8 Threads @ 4.5GHz (45×100)
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-Z87X-UD3H
Cooling Thermalright Silver Arrow
Power Supply Rosewill Capstone 550W
Memory 2*8 GB G.Skill Ares DDR3 2400
Memory Settings DDR3 – 2400 / 11-13-13-31 @ 1.65V
System Drive Crucial M4 256GB SATA III
Case Open Test Bench
Operating System Windows 7 64-bit SP1
GPU Gigabyte GTX 1070 G1 Gaming – Downclocked to Reference
Drivers Geforce 368.39

 

Maya 2013 Viewset (maya-04)

The model used in the tests is comprised by 727,500 vertices, and use a variety of common Maya graphics shading modes.
More Details on the official SPEC website.

It has been sometime since I’ve tested a fast GTX, and I wish I had some Titan X of my own (outside reviews show 123 score for the same benchmark with a 5960X CPU), but the GTX 1070 is impressive. Easily the fastest GTX I’ve tested and a whopping 57% faster than a GTX 970 (30% faster than a Titan X, although the latter would probably score a bit better on my o/ced bench system.

Solidworks 2013 SP1 Viewset (sw-03)

The sw-03 viewset was created from traces of Dassault Systemes’ SolidWorks 2013 SP1 application. Models used in the viewset range in size from 2.1 to 21 million vertices.
More Details on the official SPEC website.

 

 

With the latest Solidworks engines starting with the 2013, we see the same drastic improvements in the viewport engine to allow for gaming cards to flex some of their grunt. Even though GTX cards don’t manage to get the fastest results, those are pretty encouraging, and the GTX 1070 is easily the fastest GTX I’ve tested so far. (The Titan X scores 48 in this test, pushed by a 5960X – again, I think it would do better with my bench, as even the 970 goes much further with my 4.5GHz CPU).


CATIA™ V6 R2012 Viewset (catia-04)

The catia-04 viewset was created from traces of the graphics workload generated by the CATIA V6 R2012 application from Dassault Systemes. Model sizes range from 5.1 to 21 million vertices, and use a variety of common CATIA graphics shading modes.
More Details on the official SPEC website.

Catia V6 2012 is also much more mature towards GTX cards, though it still appears to favor AMD Firepro cards the most. The new Pascal architecture along with the latest drivers appear to be doing a great job, propelling the GTX 1070 to a higher place than a K4200! Mind you this is still a $765+ workstation card.


Siemens NX 8.0 Viewset (snx-02)

The snx-02 viewset was created from traces of the graphics workload generated by the NX 8.0 application from Siemens PLM. Model sizes range from 7.15 to 8.45 million vertices. and use a variety of common NX 8.0  graphics shading modes.
More Details on the official SPEC website.

Siemens NX’s developers apparently didn’t care much to reverse the old status with GTX cards…or maybe it’s nVidia’s drivers? OpenGL performance with this engine is severely penalized unless you are using a workstation card, and AMD’s R9 290X remains faster than the GTX 1070 by a factor of 2.5x! The 1070 is definitely not recommended for serious product design using Siemen’s NX8 – at least with models with that complexity.


Autodesk Showcase 2013 Viewset (showcase-01)

The showcase-01 viewset was created from traces of Autodesk’s Showcase 2013 application. The model used in the viewset consists of 8 million vertices.
More Details on the official SPEC website.

With showcase the GTX1070 has little issues spreading its wings. Again, an impressive result.


Creo 2™ – PTC Viewset

The creo-01 viewset was created from traces of the graphics workload generated by the Creo 2™ application from PTC. Model sizes range from 20 to 48 million vertices.
More Details on the official SPEC website.


Energy viewset (energy-01)

The energy-01 viewset is representative of a typical volume rendering application in the seismic and oil and gas fields. The 3D datasets used in this viewset are all procedurally generated using a simple random function. In the test descriptions below, medium-res refers to a 1GB dataset; large-res refers to a 3.2GB dataset. The large-res viewsets will exit on cards with less than 4GB graphics memory. 
More Details on the official SPEC website.

This test favors cards with lots of VRam, but apparently the Maxwell & Kepler architecture was reaching a plateau that the Pascal cards have surpassed. The GTX 1070 with its 8GB VRam and lots of compute potential dominates the chart leaving the original Titan to dust.

Note that the GTX Titan X has a reported score of 11 in this test, paired with a stock 5960X – as tested by an external source.


Mecical (CT/MRI) viewset (medical-01)

The medical-01 viewset is representative of a typical volume rendering application that renders a 2D projection of a 3D volumetric grid. A typical 3D grid in this viewset is a group of 3D slices acquired by a scanner (such as CT or MRI).
More Details on the official SPEC website. 

Again, the GTX 1070 is topping the charts.

Note that the GTX Titan X has a reported score of 37 in this test, paired with a stock 5960X – as tested by an external source.

Concluding with the SPECviewperf® 12 – GPU Scores, the GTX 1070 certainly has proven itself to be a worthy upgrade from not just the GTX 970 it replaces, but pretty much any last generation GTX. If only its street introduction price was not $100+ more than the GTX 970!

10 thoughts on “GTX 1070 as a CG Workstation GPU

  1. Amazing job Dimitris. Really! One question though: do you know/could assume where the 980ti falls in those benchmarks? Trying to decide between the two and the much high cuda count on the 980ti is the only thing holding me from a 1070. Thanks for the work and effort you put into those stuff. If only more people knew about this site.

  2. Hello Dimitris; You helped me with my first and only computer build, it worked perfect but died on me recently. Mother board and processor died on me. I am stuck now with an nvidia K4000, i want to pair it now with a gtx card or any that you can recommend me for the new build. I remember you helped me through a forum but i dont seem to remember wich one. i am looking at this: • Intel Core i7-6700K Skylake Processor (8M Cache, up to 4.20 GHz) (BX80662I76700K) • Cooler Master V650 Semi-Modular 650W Power Supply 80 PLUS Gold (RS650-AMAAG1-EU) • Asus Z97-A Socket LGA1150 / Z97 / 4 x DDR3 / 4 x SATA 6Gbs / ATXNoctua • NH-D15 Dual Tower CPU Air Cooler • Kingston HyperX Fury 16GB (2x8GB) DDR3 1866MHz CL10 Non-ECC DIMM Blue (HX318C10FK2/16) • Samsung 250GB 2.5″ SSD 850 Evo Series (MZ-75E250BW) • Asus nVidia Turbo GeForce GTX960 4GB GDDR5 OC (TURBO-GTX960-OC-4GD5) Plus the Nvidia Quadro K4000 hope you can help Thanks

  3. Thnx for the review Dimitris, but help me understand how much of a difference in performance boost in terms of viewport navigation and fps in 3ds Max 2014/16 you get upgrading from a 750ti to a 1070? And does the version of the software metter at this point. I am guessing there are still no adequate drivers for the new cards? Best, M. Arch. Vuk Djordjevic

  4. Again me, may I ask why you haven’t tested it with SPECapc for 3ds Max? And do you plan on testing it in the near future? Best

  5. Hi Dimitris I have built two of your $600 render nodes and they are working great! Thanks for providing the info on that. I am now wanting to put together a machine for use in VR development. The goal is to have this machine also double as a render node as well so I was thinking of going with the Xeon E3-1245 V5 as that has been incredibly reliable on the rendering front. This particular build looks to be very much in line with what is spec’d out as recommended by HTC and Occulus, but I am curious as to your view on it. Do you think this build would suffice for a VR pc or are there any changes you would recommend? I would be working on an HTC vive with a good amount of development occuring in Unreal. Also curious if you have a case that you would recommend putting this in? Thanks in advance for your feedback.

    • I assume you will be using a GTX 1070 for it? It is a very efficient GPU despite its power, so I would not be worried too much: any mATX or midi ATX case with at least one 120mm intake and one 120mm exhaust fans, will have no issue with it.

      • Thank you very much for the quick response. Yes, using the GTX 1070 for sure . Basically the build you provided in your “GTX 1070 as a CG Workstation GPU” but swapping the i7 for the Xeon. Looks as though that build will double very nicely as a VR machine/render node. As always, thanks for providing your insight.

  6. what do you think about 1060 vs 970 for 3dsmax? they are similar in price. i was looking into buying some 970 for workstation use( they have an 4 years old quadro)

    • I would probably go for the newer card. I don’t expect notable performance differences in 3DS, but the 1060 will have more VRAM that might be useful for GPU accelerated tasks and/or transitioning to higher resolution monitors in the future. If you had the 970, I would recommend keeping it, if you are buying new, go for the fresher option.

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